Harry Bates wins opening round of the 2017 Australian Rally Championship

20/3/2017

Harry Bates Corolla S2000 rallycar

Toyota’s Harry Bates has become the youngest driver ever to win a round in the Australian Rally Championship by taking out Victoria’s Eureka Rally, the opening round of the 2017 season.

Bates, 22, from Canberra and co-driver John McCarthy in the Toyota Genuine Parts Corolla were part of a three-way duel over two days and 18 competitive stages totalling 220km around Ballarat.

Harry bates and John McCarthy after winning the 2017 Eureka Rally

Harry Bates, John McCarthy and the Toyota Genuine Parts S2000 Corolla, winners of the 2017 Eureka Rally.

Bates won the first day by 14.8 seconds, with just 7.9 seconds covering the top three competitors over the two-day event.

Nathan Quinn was second in a Mitsubishi and Eli Evans third in a Peugeot.

Bates’ win, with six stage victories, came on the birthday of his father and crew chief, four-times national rally champion Neal Bates.

“It was a full-on contest between the three of us from the first stage, with the overall lead swapping around stage by stage,” Harry Bates said.

“The roads were very dusty and the battle was intense with the result in the balance until the very end, which makes it even more rewarding to come out on top and record the win.

“My co-driver John McCarthy and the whole team did a great job; and the win was even better since Sunday was Dad’s birthday as well.”

Family celebrations were tempered by desperately bad luck for Harry Bates’ younger brother Lewis, whose Corolla was destroyed.

Lewis Bates burnt rallycar

“Lewis went off the road at a crest and the car became stuck in soft sand,” Harry Bates said. “Then it caught fire and burned to the ground. We’re all devastated for him.”

The next event on the Australian Rally Championship calendar is the Make Smoking History Forest Rally in Western Australia from April 21 to 23.

Toyota motorsport: In 2017, Toyota marks the 60th anniversary of its first international motorsport entry (and the first by a Japanese car manufacturer), when it contested the 1957 Round Australia Trial. This is why many people consider Australia to be the birthplace of Toyota motorsport. Today, Toyota contests the FIA-sanctioned World Rally Championship (WRC), World Endurance Championship (WEC) which features the famed 24 Hours of Le Mans, and the gruelling Dakar Rally. Closer to home, the Toyota 86 Racing Series seeks to develop the talent of tomorrow as Australia’s premier grassroots circuit-racing category.

Bates and McCarthy Take Third in 2016 Australian Rally Championship

harry02coffsA fighting third place finish in the fifth and final round of the Australian Rally Championship (ARC) has netted the Toyota Genuine Parts team of Harry Bates and co-driver John McCarthy third overall in the 2016 title race.

Three minutes clear of their nearest competitor at the beginning of the rally’s final day, Bates and McCarthy were running to a conservative strategy with victory in sight when a puncture brought their championship hopes undone.

“We were happy with our pace, and had built a healthy lead going into the last day when a stray rock caused the front right tyre to explode,” Harry said.

“Changing it lost us a lot of time, compounded by the fact the shredded tyre split the brake line, so we had no brakes to finish the long (30km) stage, and ultimately lost five minutes,” he said.

Despite the final day drama, the team’s third place Rally Australia finish meant they took third in the title race with just eight points covering the top three ARC places.

Rally Australia centres on Coffs Harbour on the New South Wales north coast with 23 competitive stages covering a mix of shire roads and private trails, from the Woolgoolga hinterland to the north and as far south as Bowraville and Nambucca Heads.

The event combines international entrants from the World Rally Championship (WRC) with ARC competition, and Bates was excited to mix it with the best drivers on the planet, including now four-time WRC champion Sébastien Ogier.

“Competing with the WRC field this weekend was very exciting. My ultimate goal is to step up and compete at the top level, so to mix it with my heroes was special,” Harry said.

“Obviously, we’re bitterly disappointed to miss the win this weekend, but we’ve learned a lot this year, and running so consistently at the front of the field has been amazing; we’re full of optimism for 2017,” he said.

Harry’s S2000 Corolla was the very car in which his father Neal and Coral Taylor won their fourth Australian Rally Championship in 2008.

The ARC finish podium at the World Rally Championship event was a family affair, with Coral Taylor and Harry Bates’ father Neal winning their fourth Classic championship in a 1980 Toyota Celica world rally replica and, of course, Coral’s daughter Molly winning both the round and the 2017 ARC championship.

Now it’s all hands on deck back at the workshop in Canberra to prepare for an exciting start to the 2017 season!

Concept Yaris AP4 rally car

Harry Bates second at 2016 Quit Forest Rally, Neal wins Classic Challenge

Harry_2-1Harry Bates has surprised his more experienced rivals by taking Heat One honours at the Quit Forest Rally and coming second overall after a countback at round one of the 2016 Kumho Tyre Australian Rally Championship (ARC), in Busselton, Western Australia.

Driving a Neal Bates Motorsport Toyota Corolla S2000, Bates and co-driver John McCarthy held off multiple ARC champion, Simon Evans, to win Heat One by just 1.1 seconds.

Both Bates and Evans finished the overall event with the same points based on their positions in both Heat One and Heat Two, however, the bonus point given to Evans for recording the most stage wins during the event was enough to hand them the event victory.

“Simon and I will leave here on a similar amount of points, which for me is obviously still beyond what I expected coming into the weekend, so I think although I’m disappointed I’m not a bit closer to him today and that we couldn’t get that top spot but we still need to be happy with the weekend,” Bates said.

Bates admitted he was surprised with the Heat One win and feared he’d given it away when he braked too late on a corner in SS7, running wide off the. Fortunately for him, he was able to continue and managed to hold off the hard-charging Evans.

Keeping event honours in the family, Harry Bates’ father, Neal, co-driven by Coral Taylor, won the Australian Classic Challenge by over 5 minutes on both days of the rally.Neal_1

The next round of the ARC is on home ground for Harry and Neal – round two is the National Capital Rally, to be held in Canberra 27-29 May 2016.

Drivers to Compete for $125,000 in Toyota 86 Racing Series

Toyota 86 race car from the back

Toyota 86 race car from the back

Toyota has announced a generous prize pool of $125,000 for the first year of its grassroots Toyota 86 Racing Series.

The series, to be run at selected V8 Supercars events from 2016, will provide $50,000 cash for the series winner plus a $20,000 international VIP experience. Second place in the 2016 series will attract $30,000 cash while the third place-getter will receive $15,000.

An additional driver who finishes outside the top three and is judged a “rising star” will win an entry to a round of New Zealand’s Toyota Finance 86 championship, including flights and accommodation.

The Australian series is expected to start in May with other rounds scheduled for Sydney Motor Sport Park (August), Sandown (September), Bathurst (October) and Sydney Olympic Park (November).

Toyota Australia executive director sales and marketing Tony Cramb said the Toyota 86 Racing Series is an affordable, grassroots category designed to discover new motorsport talent.

Mr Cramb said the stellar careers of people like five-time Australian Touring Car champion and six-time Bathurst winner Mark Skaife and two-time Bathurst winner Tony Longhurst had begun with success in a one-make series.

“The Toyota 86 Racing Series is a great way for young amateur drivers to advance their careers, competing against and learning from professional drivers – all under the gaze of motorsport decision-makers and team owners,” Mr Cramb said.

“Drivers will also perform in front of substantial race-day crowds and large TV and internet broadcast audiences, which should assist them in gaining sponsors.

“The Toyota 86 Racing Series is the most cost-effective road to competing in Australia’s premier motorsport weekend at Bathurst in October.

“The front-engine, rear-drive 86 is ideally suited to close racing due to its superb handling and expected maximum speeds down Conrod Straight of about 230km/h.

“An entry fee of just $1,500 per round is easily the lowest amount for any mainstream national series, which reflects our desire to ensure the Toyota 86 Racing Series is affordable for anyone with the passion and talent to compete.

The grid at each round will accommodate a maximum of 32 cars, including up to five cars driven by professional drivers or other guests nominated by Toyota. The nominated drivers will not be eligible for points or prize money.

Competition will generally include three 20-minute races – one on the Saturday and two on the Sunday with grids determined by two practice sessions and a qualifying stage.

Draft sporting and technical regulations for the series have been issued by the Confederation of Australian Motor Sport (CAMS).

They provide details of control specifications including engine ECU, tyres, exhaust, brakes, suspension, roll cage and aero kit.

Toyota 86 race car from the front

Toyota 86 race car from the front

Neal Bates Motorsport developed the control specifications with a focus on safety and reliability while keeping costs as low as possible. Category management is by AirTime Autosport, run by motorsport identity Neil Crompton.

The Toyota 86 has been Australia’s best-selling sports car since its launch in 2012 and has now passed 15,000 sales on the local market.

For more information, please contact: